Tag Archive | Presbyterian Church

Pastor’s Post for February 2018

From the Pastor:

Sermons in Lent
Easter is early this year, which means that Ash Wednesday is just around the corner (February 14, 7 p.m. Massapequa). We are planning a confirmation class for this year, which will begin to meet during Lent. I am planning a series of Lenten sermons around the Apostles’ Creed, and I am asking the confirmands to attend church services during Lent, to hear and think about these sermons. At the same time, I want these sermons to be an opportunity for all church members, not just the confirmands, to return to the roots of their faith, to be reminded of the core beliefs that give us our identity as followers of Christ. In each case, we will also talk about how the Presbyterian Church looks at the elements of the Creed, and how our point of view is the same as or different from that of other denominations. This is a good time to re-examine the faith that brings us together, as we are in the process of re-organizing our life together to fashion one congregation out of two, so that Presbyterian-style Christianity can continue to witness in this area.

Congregational Merger Process

If you have not already done so, please fill out and return the worship location survey, which is printed on pink paper. You can mail it in or put it in the basket in the narthex, or hand it to me. You can also provide an e-mail response.

On Sunday, February18 following the service at Levittown there will be an open discussion session on the state of repair of our two church campuses. A number of people have asked for more information on this subject, and those of us most knowledgeable about the buildings are expected to be there to answer questions.


January 2018 – Pastor’s Post

Pastor’s Post:

As I look back on the past two and a half years, I am pleased with what we have been able to accomplish together. I was speaking with one long-term member this past week, and she reminded me that we have in many ways already become one congregation. We are accustomed to worshipping together, we share in our social events, and our sessions and deacons’ boards and many committees are now meeting jointly. This has been possible because the experience of getting to know each other has been largely a positive one. Of course, we notice our differences, the small variations in worship tradition, the differences in building use and so forth, but these variations do not divide us. We share in the joy of our faith and in our commitment to maintain a witness to the Gospel of Christ in the Presbyterian tradition in this part of Long Island.

We expect that, with the guidance of our Merger Commission and the approval of Presbytery, we will complete a legal and financial merger of the congregations this year. I am hoping that this process will proceed smoothly and will not preoccupy us. However, we hope to have “all hands on deck” for the decisions that lie ahead about our worship arrangements. We have been alternating worship locations each week for over two years. This has always been regarded as a temporary arrangement because being reliably present in one place is important for newcomers and visitors. We can’t grow if people have trouble finding us!

I understand that the decision about where to worship is complicated and sensitive. For that reason, we want everyone to be a part of the decision-making process. Later this month, you will receive a survey that I hope you will respond to quickly and thoughtfully. Basically, you will be asked your opinion about where we should worship at 10 a.m. on Sundays, the reasons that lie behind your preference, and your thoughts about the future of the building that you do not choose. For example, should there be worship at other times of the week or month in the other building? Should we continue to use it for other purposes? Should we sell it? We also want to hear any ideas you have about long-range solutions, such as selling both buildings and finding or building a new place to center our church.

Your opinions will be incorporated into our decision-making process. The final choices about worship location and building uses will be made by the sessions meeting jointly or as a merged, new session for the new United Presbyterian Church. Any property sale will need the approval of Presbytery.

I am praying that we do not become so involved in these matters of property that we lose sight of our basic mission to declare the Good News to all and to provide worship services that inspire us and give us the opportunity to praise God and to invoke God’s blessing on us and our community. I know that change can be painful and disruptive, but let us keep in mind the example of Abraham and Sarah who were summoned by God to leave their settled life and to go out into the unknown, and Elijah who found shelter where he could in the wilderness and was fed by ravens, and our Lord himself who, during his ministry, had no place he could call his own.
Thanks be to God who in His mercy has given us the gift of His presence in our midst and the equally valuable gift of our fellowship with each other. May the Lord be a pillar of fire by night and of cloud by day going before us into the future.
-Pastor Lou

Supper at Six – Sunday, May 21 at 6pm at Massapequa



Supper at Six will again meet on Sunday, May 21, 2017


 6 to 8:30pm at the Massapequa Church in the fellowship hall.


All members, family, children, grandchildren and friends from both the Levittown and Massapequa  are encouraged to attend. 


We will be conducting our “wild and crazy gift swap.”


Each attendee is asked to bring a wrapped gift valued at no more than $10.00.
Please bring a covered dish of your choice.  Please RSVP to Joan Tischner.




Pastor’s Post – May 2017


Dear Members and Friends: 

 Thank you to everyone who made Holy Week a special time of inspiration and communion with each other.  It is clear to me that we have a talented congregation that has much to offer to enrich our worship experience.  And this is not to mention the joyful Easter vigil hosted by Sweet Hollow Presbyterian Church on Saturday evening.  For the past two years we have benefited from the musical and liturgical gifts of our friends and neighbors in many Long Island congregations who come together for this special event.  It is a joyful experience to discover our fellowship in Christ extends to so many fine people all over the area. 

The life of faith is intimately related to the means of communication that are available to us. When Jesus lived, communication was so much slower than it is now, that it is hard for us to imagine how the Gospel spread from town to town.  Jesus did a lot of walking, and speaking to crowds, and preaching in synagogues.  After his death and resurrection and ascension to heaven, his disciples followed in his footsteps, walking out of Jerusalem and Galilee, travelling the roads to neighboring countries, boarding sailing vessels to reach all corners of the known world.  When they reached a new town or city, they would begin preaching in the town square and in the synagogues, if such existed there.  The missionaries, most notably Paul, then began to write letters to churches they had organized.  These letters probably traveled in the luggage of trusted members of the Christian community.  One can imagine that it would take at least several weeks for a letter to travel from Jerusalem to Ephesus or Rome.  Given these realities of communications, it took about four centuries for Christianity to become the dominant religion of the Empire.   

 Fast forward to the Protestant Reformation, almost exactly 500 years ago, and 1,500 years after the life of Christ.  The news of the Reformed faith was transmitted much more quickly than would have been possible in the ancient world through a new system of information sharing based on the printing press. It took less than one century for Luther and Calvin’s form of Christianity to take root in every corner of western civilization.  Of course, it did not become the dominant faith in many areas which remained in the grip of Catholicism, but the genie was out of the bottle in terms of the spread of information throughout the populace.  More and more people learned to read, and out of the rich soil of literate Protestant populations sprang the modern realities of representative democracy and an informed and self-determining laity and citizenry.   

 Today, we can look back on the last 100 years in which communications technology has increased the speed and the reach of information sharing at a breathtaking pace.  And now, it seems as though every year brings a new form of communication into our hands.  We have broken loose from centralized systems such as radio and TV networks.  Everybody has a chance to be a media phenomenon. Reputations can be made or destroyed overnight.  National leaders can put their messages directly into our in-boxes without the media filter we are used to.  In turn, in a matter of seconds, we the people can flood them with thousands or millions of individual messages on any given topic.   

 So far as communicating the Gospel is concerned, media technology is neutral.  The Good News can travel by word of mouth, by the printed word on paper, by preaching to an assembled audience, but it can also travel by e-mail, Facebook, You Tube, and Twitter.  Our worship is currently conducted using the printed word on paper, the spoken word using electronic microphones and speakers, and music using electronic instruments and our assembled voices.  We also use our bodies a little bit by shaking hands or embracing when we “pass the peace.”   

 As we build our new congregation, we have an important opportunity to experiment with all the new forms of communication that are available.  Money is, of course, an important limiting factor for us.  Yet, we will be doing the best we can with what we have.  As we proceed with these efforts, that started some time ago with the creation of web sites for the two congregations and Facebook pages, along with limited use of visual aids in worship, I hope you will find your experience of the Christian life being expanded in a positive direction.  Be sure to let me and the session know what you think about various innovations.   

 Three things that will be unfolding in coming months: 

1) Elder Scott Newsam is guiding us into the world of “Google for nonprofits” which promises to be a great platform for communication and work sharing within our fellowship.                                                   2) It seems likely that we will be purchasing the digital version of the new PCUSA hymnal, Glory to God.  Using projectors and screens, we will be able to enhance our music in worship with hundreds of new hymns and songs, many of which have been written in the past two decades.                                               3) We will be using projected images in worship on a regular basis.  Getting the set up to work well may take some time and effort. 

    Pastor Lou





Pastor’s Post – February 2017

From-the-Pastor-2From the Pastor:

I am pleased to announce that our two congregations will be presenting our Plumbline Report to the Presbytery Committee on Ministry on Tuesday, February 7 at 2 p.m. in the Presbytery headquarters in Commack.  Assuming that our report is approved, we will be placed on the docket of the Presbytery meeting that will be held on Tuesday, March 21.  Presbytery will move to appoint a  “commission,” which will be a small group drawn from both churches and from the Presbytery at large.  The commission will do a lot of the detail work involved in arranging the merger, such as the legal processes that will be necessary to dissolve two congregations and bring a new one into existence which will “inherit” the buildings and assets of the two older congregations.

While the commission is working on the details, the rest of us will be preparing for life together in the new congregation.  I am planning a series of small, week-day evening communion services during Lent, at which we will share the Lord’s Supper with people from both churches.  I will invite each of you to a specific service either in a home or at one of our church buildings.  Before partaking of communion, we will spend some time getting to know each other better and to talk about our hopes and fears for the future of our new congregation.  We will pray for the success of our new enterprise.

Please get out your copy of our Plumbline Report.  We mailed it to all members right around January 1, and I hope you still have yours.  If not, please give me a call, and I will get another one to you.  The third section, “What is God Calling us to Do?”  includes several commitments we are making to prepare ourselves for a dynamic new way of being church.  You will see in those paragraphs several important goals:

1) Deepening our worship experience through the use of silence, audiovisual aids and other innovations;

2) Training ourselves in conflict management;

3) Working to make our congregation truly open and welcoming to all inquirers;

4) Training ourselves to do effective outreach to people in our community including learning how to utilize modern forms of communication to stay connected with each other and to share our invitations with a wide audience;

5) Exploring the best ways to continue our commitment to the welfare of children in our communities, possibly moving toward comprehensive child care service;

6) Taking seriously the needs of our aging neighbors, many of whom are isolated and struggling with depression as well as physical infirmities.

With the cooperation of the sessions, I will be organizing events and opportunities to pursue these goals in coming months.  This will be an exciting and challenging year, and I urge you to think of it as an adventure in the life of faith, something that will carry Christ’s community far into the future.  Yes, we are blessed to be here, in this place at this time!  Thanks be to God.

-Pastor Lou


A special note on current events:

It is difficult to talk about politics in the context of the church.  We all understand that we do not want political differences to get in the way of our fellowship in Christ, yet many of us feel strongly one way or the other about recent events.  I think it is important to recognize that our national political life has entered a time of unprecedented confusion and conflict.  If you find the news these days to be even more upsetting than usual, I want you to feel free to talk to me about it.  It is always good to be able to share our concerns about public affairs with a friend and to pray together.   Discussing things in a non-judgmental atmosphere helps to lower our anxiety level, and we can be reminded of the enduring value of Christ’s teachings and the spiritual and emotional comfort we gain from the presence of the Holy Spirit.