Tag Archive | pastor’s post

Pastor’s Post – June 2017

What Will be Happening in Church This Summer

Summer is a time to relax, slow down a bit, and maybe try a thing or two new and different.  I know that many of you will be away vacationing part of the time.  When you travel, look for opportunities to worship with other congregations.  You may pick up ideas that will enrich our spiritual life here.

The Love We Share sermon series

During June, I will be delivering a special series of sermons on the subject:  “The Love We Share.”  (It turns out that I unconsciously borrowed this title from a song in a Disney animated movie about mermaids!)  We will explore together how God’s love for us informs our love for each other, including sexual love, and how the church’s understanding of gender and sexual orientation and marriage has changed and continues to change.  I understand that this remains an area of controversy in churches, and it is not my intention to sow discord, but it is important that we reflect together on certain issues as we strive to shape the mission of our new church.  At least one of the sermons will include an opportunity for dialogue with the congregation, and if there is a felt need for more conversation and study, we certainly can arrange that as well.

Pentecost:  Celebration of the Spirit

Sunday, June 4, the Day of Pentecost, we will be blessed by a special musical contribution by Justin Ramlall who plays the trombone.   Come on time so you won’t miss his prelude.

Honoring our children and young people

Sunday, June 11 during worship we will honor our Sunday School teachers and students and celebrate the achievements of our young people who are completing another school term, graduating or otherwise distinguishing themselves.

Guest Preacher

Sunday, July 9 I will be in St. Louis, attending the bi-annual meeting of PCUSA people known as the “Big Tent.”  The Rev. Mark Tammen, General Presbyter for Long Island, will be preaching at Massapequa.  It has been awhile since Mark has been with us, so please take advantage of this opportunity to hear Mark’s presentation and to greet him.

Worship and Recreation in the Great Outdoors

Last summer the Gathering wrapped up its year by going outside.  We shared a time of reflection and prayer at a nearby organic farm on a warm Sunday afternoon in late June.  This year, the sessions are inviting all members and friends to a special outdoor worship service and picnic on Sunday, July 16.  We will gather at 10 a.m. in Wantagh Park.  The lunch is potluck.  Our reservation allows us to stay as long as we wish through the afternoon, so there will be plenty of time to enjoy God’s creation and have fun together.

Special Music

Our music and choir director, Wayne Dietrich, will be away the first three Sundays of July.  Stella LaMassa and others will be arranging special musical contributions for worship that you won’t want to miss.

Lay Preachers in August

I will be away after Sunday August 6 until Labor Day weekend.  For three Sundays you will be blessed by messages from members of our churches who have volunteered to preach in my absence.  I am sorry I will miss these occasions, and if you are in town, you will really enjoy being in church on those Sabbaths.

Pastor’s Post – May 2017

From-the-Pastor-2

Dear Members and Friends: 

 Thank you to everyone who made Holy Week a special time of inspiration and communion with each other.  It is clear to me that we have a talented congregation that has much to offer to enrich our worship experience.  And this is not to mention the joyful Easter vigil hosted by Sweet Hollow Presbyterian Church on Saturday evening.  For the past two years we have benefited from the musical and liturgical gifts of our friends and neighbors in many Long Island congregations who come together for this special event.  It is a joyful experience to discover our fellowship in Christ extends to so many fine people all over the area. 

The life of faith is intimately related to the means of communication that are available to us. When Jesus lived, communication was so much slower than it is now, that it is hard for us to imagine how the Gospel spread from town to town.  Jesus did a lot of walking, and speaking to crowds, and preaching in synagogues.  After his death and resurrection and ascension to heaven, his disciples followed in his footsteps, walking out of Jerusalem and Galilee, travelling the roads to neighboring countries, boarding sailing vessels to reach all corners of the known world.  When they reached a new town or city, they would begin preaching in the town square and in the synagogues, if such existed there.  The missionaries, most notably Paul, then began to write letters to churches they had organized.  These letters probably traveled in the luggage of trusted members of the Christian community.  One can imagine that it would take at least several weeks for a letter to travel from Jerusalem to Ephesus or Rome.  Given these realities of communications, it took about four centuries for Christianity to become the dominant religion of the Empire.   

 Fast forward to the Protestant Reformation, almost exactly 500 years ago, and 1,500 years after the life of Christ.  The news of the Reformed faith was transmitted much more quickly than would have been possible in the ancient world through a new system of information sharing based on the printing press. It took less than one century for Luther and Calvin’s form of Christianity to take root in every corner of western civilization.  Of course, it did not become the dominant faith in many areas which remained in the grip of Catholicism, but the genie was out of the bottle in terms of the spread of information throughout the populace.  More and more people learned to read, and out of the rich soil of literate Protestant populations sprang the modern realities of representative democracy and an informed and self-determining laity and citizenry.   

 Today, we can look back on the last 100 years in which communications technology has increased the speed and the reach of information sharing at a breathtaking pace.  And now, it seems as though every year brings a new form of communication into our hands.  We have broken loose from centralized systems such as radio and TV networks.  Everybody has a chance to be a media phenomenon. Reputations can be made or destroyed overnight.  National leaders can put their messages directly into our in-boxes without the media filter we are used to.  In turn, in a matter of seconds, we the people can flood them with thousands or millions of individual messages on any given topic.   

 So far as communicating the Gospel is concerned, media technology is neutral.  The Good News can travel by word of mouth, by the printed word on paper, by preaching to an assembled audience, but it can also travel by e-mail, Facebook, You Tube, and Twitter.  Our worship is currently conducted using the printed word on paper, the spoken word using electronic microphones and speakers, and music using electronic instruments and our assembled voices.  We also use our bodies a little bit by shaking hands or embracing when we “pass the peace.”   

 As we build our new congregation, we have an important opportunity to experiment with all the new forms of communication that are available.  Money is, of course, an important limiting factor for us.  Yet, we will be doing the best we can with what we have.  As we proceed with these efforts, that started some time ago with the creation of web sites for the two congregations and Facebook pages, along with limited use of visual aids in worship, I hope you will find your experience of the Christian life being expanded in a positive direction.  Be sure to let me and the session know what you think about various innovations.   

 Three things that will be unfolding in coming months: 

1) Elder Scott Newsam is guiding us into the world of “Google for nonprofits” which promises to be a great platform for communication and work sharing within our fellowship.                                                   2) It seems likely that we will be purchasing the digital version of the new PCUSA hymnal, Glory to God.  Using projectors and screens, we will be able to enhance our music in worship with hundreds of new hymns and songs, many of which have been written in the past two decades.                                               3) We will be using projected images in worship on a regular basis.  Getting the set up to work well may take some time and effort. 

    Pastor Lou

 

 

 

 

Pastor’s Post for April

From the Pastor

Dear Members and Friends: 

 The Lenten home communions have been a delightful and meaningful experience for those who have participated.  The hour and a half that we have spent together on a week day evening has provided time to get to know each other in a way that is hard to do on busy Sunday mornings.  I want every member of both our churches to have the opportunity to attend a home communion, so we will continue to hold them in coming months, until everyone has been invited at least once.  I urge you to make time to attend, so that you can gain a deeper understanding of the congregation to which you belong.   

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 This year we are adding an early morning service to our observance of Easter.  At 7:30 Easter morning (April 16) we will gather on the lawn at Levittown Church (Miles Hall if it’s raining) to celebrate the resurrection of our Lord. We will be featuring the musical and dramatic talent of our young people. Rod Sklar is organizing a sumptuous Easter breakfast that will follow the early service.  Come early! Stay late!  Attend the traditional 10 a.m. service to make a morning of it. 

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 A recent presentation and discussion at the Gathering laid on our hearts the challenge of including and supporting children and adults with special needs.  There is an active conversation continuing about how our church might be more involved in this important ministry.  This topic brings to mind the life and writings of the Rev Henri Nouwen who was a major figure in Christian spiritualty in the second half of the twentieth century. He taught at different times at both Yale and Harvard Divinity School.  In the last part of his life in the 1980’s and 1990’s he answered God’s call to live and work in the “L’Arche” community in Canada. This organization was launched in France to provide a supportive residential community for people with severe disabilities.  “L’Arche” emphasizes the spiritual life of both its residents and their caregivers.   Allow me to share two paragraphs from Rev Nouwen’s reflections on his experiences with L’Arche.  Here he is reflecting on the difference between human glory and

 God’s glory: 

 “. . .human glory is always connected with some form of competition.  Human glory is the result of being considered better, faster, more beautiful, more powerful, or more successful than others.  Glory conferred by people is glory which results from being favorably compared to other people.  The better our scores on the scoreboard of life, the more glory we receive.  This glory comes with upward mobility.  The higher we climb on the ladder of success, the more glory we collect.  But the same glory also creates our darkness.  Human glory, based on competition, leads to rivalry; rivalry carries within it the beginning of violence; and violence is the way to death.  Human glory proves to be vain glory, false glory, mortal glory. 

How then do we come to see and receive God’s glory?  In his Gospel, John shows that God chose to reveal his glory to us in his humiliation.  That is the good, but also disturbing, news. God, in his infinite wisdom, chose to reveal his dignity to us not through competition, but through compassion, that is, through suffering with us.  God chose the way of downward mobility.  Every time Jesus speaks about being glorified and giving glory, he always refers to his humiliation and death. It is through the way of the cross that Jesus gives glory to God, receives glory from God, and makes God’s glory known to us.  The glory of the resurrection can never be separated from the glory of the cross.  The risen Lord always shows us his wounds.

 Thus, the glory of God stands in contrast to the glory of people.  People seek glory by moving upward.  God reveals his glory by moving downward.  If we truly want to see the glory of God, we must move downward with Jesus.  This is the deepest reason for living in solidarity with poor, oppressed, and handicapped people.  They are the ones through whom God’s glory can manifest itself to us.  They show us the way to God, the way of salvation.”

 

Pastor’s Post – March 2017

 

From the Pastor

From the Pastor:

 

Special events this Lenten-Easter Season

 

This year, we are adding two activities that I hope you will support by your attendance.  First, we are arranging home communions to occur each week of Lent.  You will receive a personal invitation to one of these, a week or ten days in advance of the event.  The communion service will take place either in the home of a member or at one of our two church buildings.  We will meet at 7:30 on a week night and be done by 9.  People from both congregations will be invited to the evenings, to create an opportunity to get to know each other better as we move closer to merger.  In addition to sharing the Lord’s Supper, we will spend some time sharing about our respective church experiences and what we hope for from a merged and renewed congregation.  

 

Our second innovation will be an early Easter morning service on the lawn at Levittown Church.  We will gather at 7:30 a.m. on Sunday, April 16 to celebrate the events of that long-ago Easter dawn when the world was changed forever.  (If the weather is bad, we will go inside.) This will be an act of public worship that will demonstrate to one and all the promise of our new life together in Christ.  There will be a breakfast following worship, and many of you I’m hoping will stay to attend the 10 a.m. service, also at Levittown.  

 

 -Pastor Lou

 

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Pastor’s Post – February 2017

From-the-Pastor-2From the Pastor:

I am pleased to announce that our two congregations will be presenting our Plumbline Report to the Presbytery Committee on Ministry on Tuesday, February 7 at 2 p.m. in the Presbytery headquarters in Commack.  Assuming that our report is approved, we will be placed on the docket of the Presbytery meeting that will be held on Tuesday, March 21.  Presbytery will move to appoint a  “commission,” which will be a small group drawn from both churches and from the Presbytery at large.  The commission will do a lot of the detail work involved in arranging the merger, such as the legal processes that will be necessary to dissolve two congregations and bring a new one into existence which will “inherit” the buildings and assets of the two older congregations.

While the commission is working on the details, the rest of us will be preparing for life together in the new congregation.  I am planning a series of small, week-day evening communion services during Lent, at which we will share the Lord’s Supper with people from both churches.  I will invite each of you to a specific service either in a home or at one of our church buildings.  Before partaking of communion, we will spend some time getting to know each other better and to talk about our hopes and fears for the future of our new congregation.  We will pray for the success of our new enterprise.

Please get out your copy of our Plumbline Report.  We mailed it to all members right around January 1, and I hope you still have yours.  If not, please give me a call, and I will get another one to you.  The third section, “What is God Calling us to Do?”  includes several commitments we are making to prepare ourselves for a dynamic new way of being church.  You will see in those paragraphs several important goals:

1) Deepening our worship experience through the use of silence, audiovisual aids and other innovations;

2) Training ourselves in conflict management;

3) Working to make our congregation truly open and welcoming to all inquirers;

4) Training ourselves to do effective outreach to people in our community including learning how to utilize modern forms of communication to stay connected with each other and to share our invitations with a wide audience;

5) Exploring the best ways to continue our commitment to the welfare of children in our communities, possibly moving toward comprehensive child care service;

6) Taking seriously the needs of our aging neighbors, many of whom are isolated and struggling with depression as well as physical infirmities.

With the cooperation of the sessions, I will be organizing events and opportunities to pursue these goals in coming months.  This will be an exciting and challenging year, and I urge you to think of it as an adventure in the life of faith, something that will carry Christ’s community far into the future.  Yes, we are blessed to be here, in this place at this time!  Thanks be to God.

-Pastor Lou

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A special note on current events:

It is difficult to talk about politics in the context of the church.  We all understand that we do not want political differences to get in the way of our fellowship in Christ, yet many of us feel strongly one way or the other about recent events.  I think it is important to recognize that our national political life has entered a time of unprecedented confusion and conflict.  If you find the news these days to be even more upsetting than usual, I want you to feel free to talk to me about it.  It is always good to be able to share our concerns about public affairs with a friend and to pray together.   Discussing things in a non-judgmental atmosphere helps to lower our anxiety level, and we can be reminded of the enduring value of Christ’s teachings and the spiritual and emotional comfort we gain from the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Pastor’s Post – January 2017

presbyterain-symbol

A Friend on the Road Ahead:  Working with Presbytery 

 This year, 2017, our two congregations will continue on our road toward merger.  It is my hope and expectation that at Easter of 2018 (April 1) we will have a grand celebration of our new unified church.

Celebrating with us at that time, I trust, will be many representatives of other Presbyterian churches on Long Island.  These are our brothers and sisters in Christ, joined together with us as members of the Presbytery of Long Island.  As we move down our road this year, the Presbytery will become a more visible and important partner for us.  It is important that we have a clear understanding of the role of Presbytery in our congregational life.

The Presbyterian Church in the USA is a part of the worldwide fellowship of Reformed churches.  This means we are theological and ecclesiological descendants of the church that John Calvin founded in Geneva, Switzerland in the 16th century.  Our more immediate spiritual ancestors were the people of the Church of Scotland.  Reformed theology leads quite naturally to democratic governance.  Instead of relying on bishops and priests to make decisions for us, we govern ourselves.  All authority among Presbyterians is derived from church members who elect their ruling elders and their teaching elders (pastors).

In order to maintain a unity of purpose and practice and to organize missions and educational institutions, the Presbyterian Church maintains regional and national councils.  Thus, our two congregations are members of the Presbytery of Long Island, the Synod of the Northeast, and the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the USA.

The Presbytery of Long Island has 55 local congregations within it.  There are 67 lay commissioners who represent these congregations when Presbytery meets, which is about five times a year.  (There are a few large congregations who are allowed to send more than one person to Presbytery, and that is why there are more commissioners than congregations.)  There are also over 100 clergy serving or retired who are eligible to attend and vote at Presbytery meetings.  Some of these clergy are living outside the area or are not interested in being active, so the number actually present at any given meeting of Presbytery is much lower.

Presbytery maintains a number of committees.  Arguably, the most important of these are the Committee on Ministry which oversees business related to our clergy, and the Board of Trustees, which is responsible for matters involving finance and real estate.

Our two congregations are represented in the Presbytery of Long Island by our clergy (currently, that’s me) and lay persons (one for Levittown and one for Massapequa) who are elected by their respective sessions.  At the present time, Maria Studer represents Levittown Church with Marilyn Rodahan as alternate. Massapequa Church does not have a designated commissioner but seeks volunteers from meeting to meeting.

Our congregations contribute funds to help keep Presbytery and the Synod and General Assembly operating.  We most often get involved with Presbytery when we are choosing pastoral leadership.  This is because Presbytery is responsible for vetting and approving all clergy working in our congregations.  Presbytery also plays an important role when disputes arise between clergy and their congregants.

Presbytery is also involved in the stewardship of real property owned by congregations.  Any sale or long-term lease of a manse or a church building must be approved by Presbytery.  This is to insure that these large assets are not wasted or stolen and that the proceeds from sales or leases are used to sustain and/or grow Presbyterian congregations and mission.  If a congregation remains active, it will almost certainly keep the proceeds of the sale of its real estate for its own use, although Presbytery may impose certain restrictions on how the funds are used.

I have observed over the years that congregations frequently find themselves at odds with Presbytery or one of its committees. It is easy to get into the mentality that Presbytery is some kind of outside force that is invading our business and messing up our plans.  It certainly is true that at times the need for Presbytery approval of an action leads to annoying delays.  However, if we remember that Presbytery is a body made up of people who have been democratically selected both to be leaders of their congregations and voting reps at Presbytery, then maybe we can overcome our unhappiness.  We are all in the Presbyterian boat together, and we need to respect those who we have been chosen to lead us at all levels of governance and administration.   If you think democracy is distressing, just consider the alternatives!

If we get better acquainted with Presbytery and its officers, I am sure we will find it will be a supportive ally in our efforts to re-organize and to create a new church and a revitalized ministry.

 

-Pastor Lou

 

Pastor’s Post – December 2016

From the Pastor

Dear friends: 

 As 2016 draws to a close, we find ourselves once again starting up a new liturgical year with that old friend, Advent, as our spiritual guide and companion. This year, the December lectionary features several wonderful readings from the prophet Isaiah about the things God promises for the future of His people.  “They shall beat their swords into plowshares, their spears into pruning hooks.”  “The wolf shall live with the lamb, the leopard shall lie down with the kid, . . .and a little child shall lead them.”  “Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf unstopped; then the lame shall leap like a deer, and the tongue of the speechless sing for joy.”  “They will not hurt or destroy on all my holy mountain; for the earth will be full of the knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea.” 

 As we read these beautiful words, full of hope and promise, we cannot help but wonder when this time of perfect fulfillment will happen.  As we gaze at the world, both here in our own community and around the globe, it is hard to see that we are making any progress toward the Kingdom of God.  Anger and disappointment seem to be in the ascendancy among Americans, rather than the feelings of excitement and joy that we associate with Advent and Christmas.  Yet, here in our own worshiping community we are beginning to see a new dawn on the horizon. We are shaping our future together, and we are glimpsing a bright future for God’s people on the south shore of Long Island.  We want to share this positive vision with each other and with our neighbors.   

In order to begin this process of sharing, which I trust will be inspirational and motivating for us, we can take as our starting point the “Plumbline” planning document that our Mission Planning Committee has written.  This is a three part plan.  Part One, in which we identify who we are, was printed in last month’s newsletter.  This December issue includes part II of the plan in which we look at our local communities and define our concerns about those communities, thus providing the context for our mission.  Within the next few days, part 3 of the study, in which we define our mission, that is, what we hope to be and to do as a newly unified congregation, will be available for review and discussion.   

The full report will be presented to a joint session meeting on Sunday, December 4.  Assuming that a final version is approved there, we expect to present the report to Presbytery’s Committee on Ministry in January or February, with final approval by Presbytery in March.  We will then be able to proceed to the “nuts and bolts” of our congregational merger.  I want all members of the Massapequa and Levittown churches to read our planning document, comment on it, and, I hope, become as excited as I am about the prospects for our new, unified congregation.   

 In the meantime, enjoy the season!  Take time out of your business to treat yourself and those near and dear to you.  Let us all thank God for this community of Christians that supports us and surrounds us with love.  

  

-Pastor Lou 

 

 

 

Pastor’s Post – June 2016

From the Pastor

Dear Friends,

Sundays in June offer exciting and interesting events that deserve your participation.  This coming Sabbath, the 5th, we will be worshipping at Levittown and holding an unofficial, non-business meeting of both Levittown and Massapequa members after service. As Maria and Joan, the Clerks of Session, have told you, we will be holding an advisory vote on the question of going forward with a study process to prepare for a formal merger of the two congregations.  We are going to do this by paper ballot.  We will take some time before the vote to talk about the study process that we are planning and how you can be part of it.  If it is impossible for you to be with us this Sunday, we still would appreciate hearing from you.  What have you appreciated about our joint worship and other cooperative activities over the past year or so?  What do you wish we could do more of?  What thoughts do you have about our mission?  Would it change if we merge?  How can you imagine our use of our two church buildings in the future?

On June 12 at Massapequa, we will bring into membership eleven young people who have been participating in the confirmation class this year.   This will be a great opportunity to catch a glimpse of the faith that is alive in these bright young people.

The afternoon Contemporary Service known as “The Gathering” will resume this Sunday, the 5th at 5:30 p.m. and continue through June 26th.  The last meeting of the Gathering will be held on June 26th. from 2-4pm at the Homecoming Farm in Amityville (555 Albany Ave).  The service will honor God’s creation and give us an opportunity to pray and praise God together in the great outdoors.

-Pastor Lou

Pastor’s Post – May 2016

From the Pastor

What I Did on Spring Vacation. . .

My family spent a lovely week in a beautiful place:  Portland, Oregon.  Both my wife and I have close relatives living there, and Louis and Velma found a lot of cousins to play with, on both sides of the family.

Portland is a study in contrasts:  on the one hand, it is a self-consciously beautiful city with wonderful plantings, attractive and user friendly public transportation, plentiful benches and resting stops for pedestrians, laid-back coffee houses (not all Starbucks!) and striking views of the Willamette River and the great volcanic mountains to the east and north. Much of the waterfront has been transformed in recent years from a dismal commercial wilderness into a lovely public park.  On the other hand, the poor and homeless are omnipresent, often asking for a handout.  Recently, the mayor declared that the homeless could legally camp on any public green space, and this has led to small tent settlements springing up in many neighborhoods.  Permanent residents near these areas are not amused, and political trouble is brewing.  In addition, I learned from a college friend who is now a prominent attorney in the city that Portland’s high school graduation rate is abysmal.  And this in an area that is now heavily dependent on tech industries that demand a highly skilled and highly trained workforce.

On Sunday morning, I visited a local Presbyterian congregation in a suburban area about 15 miles from city center.  The Oak Hills Presbyterian Church has a membership of about 140 but a remarkably high attendance record, averaging over 100 each Sunday morning.  The congregation seems about evenly divided between an early “contemporary” service and a later traditional service.  The annual budget runs close to $250,000. The church’s modern building sits on an attractive site with some open space around it.  The Rev. Jeremy Sanderson, a graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary and a man in his early thirties, gave an inspirational sermon based on the life of David.  I attended the 11 a.m. traditional service, which is preceded by the 9:30 “contemporary” service.  Although labeled traditional, the service I attended featured liberal use of visual aids—a computer-based use of projected images during the service included lyrics for all hymns sung as well as pictures and outlines to supplement the words of the pastor and to advertise congregational activities.  The worship space uses a lot of natural light and movable chairs that allowed for a variety of seating arrangements.  I was not able to attend the contemporary service at 9:30, but judging from a large drum set that is a permanent feature in the sanctuary, I would guess it uses modern, youth-oriented music.

Should anyone be interested, I have a copy of Oak Hills’ 2015 annual report.  I could not help but imagine how a church such as this one might serve as a model for what our two churches might be able to build—in terms of modern facilities–if we are successful in our merger efforts and can begin to re-build our ministry as one congregation.

 

 

Pastor’s Post – March 2016

From-the-Pastor-2

Dear brothers and sisters:

As part of our Lenten emphasis on the Scriptures of the Old Testament, we have recently read in worship the story of the great gathering of the people of God convened by Joshua at Shechem to re-commit their national life to God.  This story contains the Old Testament in a nutshell:  1) God offers the covenant of his steadfast loyalty and love to the people; 2) the people promise in return to be faithful to God and his law for their lives; 3) the people then wander away from God and forget their promises to be faithful; 4) God punishes the people through defeat and occupation by hostile forces; 5) the people repent and cry out to God for salvation; and finally, 6) God hears their cries and restores them to their lives of peace and prosperity in return for their promised faithfulness.  This is the cycle of human behavior repeated several times in the Old Testament.

This Lent and Easter season, I would like us to borrow a script from Joshua and re-examine our covenant relationship with God and each other.   In our worship services the next several Sundays  and in our Sunday evening Bible studies, we will continue to explore the story of the people of God and their covenant relationship to God as it is told in the Old Testament.  On Easter morning, we, as one people, will make our own re-commitment to the divine covenant. Let us for the moment set aside the technicalities of merger and a new identity, and assume our identity as the unified assembly of the people of God.

I want us this year during the Easter service to renew our covenant relationship with God through a litany that we all will help write. So, I would like you to write down on a sheet of paper the things that God has done for us over the years. Now, I’m going to ask you to write in two columns—one column can be for the blessings that God has bestowed on you and your family, and the other column will be for blessings that God has bestowed on us as a people, as a church—you can think of your own church, Massapequa or Levittown plus our combined effort, should you wish to mention that.

On the other side of the form will be an opportunity to say what we should include in our re-commitment—what promises we should be making as a people to our God. This one too, will have a column for your personal re-commitments, and for the re-commitments you feel should we should make as a people of God—as one church growing out of two, however you want to think about it.

I’m going to distribute the form next week in church (March 6) and give you one week to work on it, and I’ll be the editor, to turn it into a litany of thanksgiving and re-commitment. You can sign the form if you so choose, or just contribute it anonymously. On Easter morning during our 10 a.m. service we will gather as the people of God gathered at Shechem to re-commit to the Lord and to the future of his ministry in this place.

Let this liturgy of re-commitment be the beginning our goal-setting for our life together, our renewed community life that we will live in the marvelous light that shines forth from the face of the risen Savior.  The apostle Paul reassures us in I Corinthians 10: 13 that God will not abandon us, that He will not let us succumb to the enticements of the devil, if we approach him with humbleness and repentance. Through his covenant, God will reward us beyond all that we ask or think, so let us turn our hearts during this special month toward God, our pillar of fire by night and cloud by day who will lead us through the wilderness of doubt and confusion into the promised land of love, justice and peace.

-Pastor Lou